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055: Mini: Measuring Success

This week’s episode revisit’s the question of what success means to you and starts by asking, how do you measure that success?  This is a very deceptive question and when you peel back the layers, it can impact behaviours and cause of interesting reflections!

Transcript

[FX INTRO JINGLE AND UNDERSCORE FOLLOWING INTRO DIALOGUE WITH MUSIC – “WELCOME TO THE CURIOUS COACH PODCAST, SO BUCKLE UP AS WE TRAVEL AROUND AND EXPLORE THE WORLD OF COACHING - HERE’S YOUR HOST AND PROFESSIONAL COACH – STEPHEN CLEMENTS” ]

Hello and welcome to this weekly mini-episode of the Curious Coach podcast.  This week’s reflective question pulls together a few threads that have been bubbling beneath the surface for me over the last few weeks.  In a previous episode, I’d asked about what success means to you.  Now, I want to get a bit little more specific.   How do you measure success?

Let me give you an example.  I was reflecting about my coaching journey and started to be curious about how I measure my success as a coach. How am I judging that as a success or not? Now, whilst that sounds fairly simple, it opens a whole host of different thoughts.

For example, am I measuring success by how I work with an individual client or more broadly at a coaching practice level, or some combination of both.  If I’m measuring it at the coaching practice level, then I might be tempted to look at the number of hours of coaching I’ve delivered, or the number of clients I’ve coached or even the revenue I’ve generated from coaching.  But are these really measures of success?   Does it say anything about how effective I’m being as a coach?  Is effectiveness and success related?    And does my choice of metric impact my behaviour?   Am I simply working towards improving a metric rather than impacting my success?  For example, If I’m focused purely on the number of hours of coaching I’m delivering, is that going to drive a certain behaviour, and are those behaviours healthy or not?

And, if I focus on measuring success with an individual client, that can get even more interesting.  Is success about how much movement I’ve gotten for a client?  Or how I’ve been able to help a client?  But wait, depending on your coaching philosophy, it might not even be your job to move or help a client… but to facilitate the client to do this for themselves.  So why would you use this as metric for measuring your success?  This is all about my ego rather than measuring success!  And as a result, are you now putting undue pressure on yourself to get results and move the client forward?

In fact, take another step back.  What am I trying to achieve by measuring my success?  Why is this important?  Am I trying to appease my ego, or build up my own self-belief or self-esteem? Or my confidence?  In fact, once I have a metric for success, what will that actually mean?  And if I change that value over time, what will actually be different for me as a result?

Hmm… there’s lots of reflecting to be done on this one I think!  And I’m curious whether you’ve ever taken the time to think about this for yourself as well?

So maybe that’s this week’s challenge:  Think about how you’re measuring success and also to reflect on whether this is driving certain behaviours, and what the value to you, in being able to measure your own success.  Be curious about what’s going on there for you.

As always, there’s no right or wrong answer.  Simply be curious and reflect. As always, I’d love to hear how you got on and any thoughts that came up for you. So please don’t hesitate to get in touch by sending me an email to stephen@stephenclements.ie and that’s stephen with a p.h.  Full details of this and all the other episodes can be found on my website at stephenclements.ie/podcast

Thanks for listening and until next week, don’t forget - stay curious!